Law Suits Relating to Botox Treatments & Injections – Safety Advice

Law Suits Relating to Botox Treatments & Injections – Safety Advice

In 1989, Botox was approved for medical and therapeutic use.  Whilst this treatment has become very wide spread in the UK, and is generally considered to be safe, there have been occasions where those women (and men) being treated have been adversely affected, and as such have looked to the legal profession for advice and help with what to do.

For example, in 2002, a case was brought against the Allergan company by a female patient who reported migraines, fatigue, neck pain, and trouble breathing and swallowing for nearly half a year after receiving Botox injections. She didn’t win the case, but the company did accept that the warning insert that came with the product stated that Botox had unknown risk when used for anti-wrinkle treatment when does of more than 20 uses were administered.

There had been some clinical studies that found there was a potential link to migraines and flu-like symptoms, which perhaps should have been heeded properly, and given proper consideration on labelling and those practitioners administering the procedures.

Fast forward to 2006, and there were 4 cases of people developing botulism after receiving Botox injections, but this was where the cosmetic clinic administering the injections had been found to be unlicensed and not approved to offer treatments such as these.

NHS Advice

If you are thinking about using Botox injections, then be absolutely sure about the reasons why you might want to use this type of non-surgical treatment. It can be expensive and will have limitations in how well it works.

In the UK, injections will cost between £150 and £400 for a session but will depend on how much is used. There is no guarantees that it will work, for example, it will not help with sagging eye lids or eye bags.

Take your time to find a reputable practitioner and one who is properly qualified and practises in a clean, safe and appropriate environment. Ask the practitioner what you should do if something were to go wrong.

Botulinum toxin is a prescription-only medicine that should only be prescribed and given by an appropriately trained healthcare professional, such as a doctor, dentist, pharmacist prescriber, or nurse prescriber.

For the NHS advice in full, please click here.

Our Advice

If you are considering having Botox injections, then do your background research and always ensure that the cosmetic clinic you are thinking about using are approved and have a track record of administering these types of treatments.

If you do feel that you have developed problems after receiving Botox injections and would like to talk to us about how we can help with cosmetic clinic injury claims, then please contact us. You can also read about how we work with these types of claims too by visiting our homepage and completing the claim form or calling us on our London number.

2018-02-12T08:08:12+00:00 February 12th, 2018|